COMPUTER CRASH!

Just as I was about to send the final version of my novel off to the publisher my computer crashed. My wonderful friend Mika allowed me to use hers for the day. But since I don’t know how long my laptop is going to have to spend in the hospital, blogging might be intermittent for the next few days.

In the meantime, I’ll try to tweet via my cellphone.

09forsythe_650

As soon as I return, more on this year’s Fall For Dance Festival, as well as my thoughts on¬†William Forsythe’s Decreation which I recently saw at BAM. I normally really like Forsythe, but I felt you had to have read the Anne Carson essay (of the same name) that the work is based on in order to understand it. Did anyone in NY see it? (photo by Andrea Mohin from NY Times review.)

4 Comments

  1. I saw it. It was a strage atmosphere. The worst audience I've ever shared a room with :-( they were behaving as if they had come to see a comedy and were laughing (hard) at the most painful moments… yet I found it superb. having read the essay helps, of course, but I feel the piece has a life of it's own, way beyond the theory that inspires it.

  2. i wrote a comment but it seems it got lost :-(

    i was trying to say that I saw it in brooklyn. that it was a weird atmosphere with the worst audience i've ever shared a room with. people behaving like they had come to see a comedy. laughing at the most painful moments.

    still, deconstruction survived. i loved it and although i agree that carson's text helps to understand the meaning of it, deconstruction has a life of its own beyond the inspiring text and that's also valuable. it's not like you can't enjoy it if you did not read the essay or so.

    do you have it? can i get a copy of it?

    greetz,

    O.

  3. I saw it. It was a strage atmosphere. The worst audience I've ever shared a room with :-( they were behaving as if they had come to see a comedy and were laughing (hard) at the most painful moments… yet I found it superb. having read the essay helps, of course, but I feel the piece has a life of it's own, way beyond the theory that inspires it.

  4. i wrote a comment but it seems it got lost :-(

    i was trying to say that I saw it in brooklyn. that it was a weird atmosphere with the worst audience i've ever shared a room with. people behaving like they had come to see a comedy. laughing at the most painful moments.

    still, deconstruction survived. i loved it and although i agree that carson's text helps to understand the meaning of it, deconstruction has a life of its own beyond the inspiring text and that's also valuable. it's not like you can't enjoy it if you did not read the essay or so.

    do you have it? can i get a copy of it?

    greetz,

    O.

Comments are closed