WHEN CRITICS BECOME PART OF THE PERFORMANCE

Top photo of Glover taken from here, photo of Macaulay from here.

The other night on the stage of the Joyce Theater, tapper Savion Glover launched into a short tirade against Sir Alastair in response to this. (Leigh Witchel, the author of the Post piece linked to above made clear on his Facebook page that Glover’s words were spoken onstage, during his performance).  Haha!

4 Comments

  1. Ha! Talk about uncomfortable.

  2. I felt like going into a tirade at Macauley myself after I read his review of Darci Kistler’s farewell performance. What was the point of ripping her apart on her retirement night? What did he gain by doing that? I felt like writing to the New York Times in complaint but figured they don’t care. But honestly I thought it was in very poor taste to criticize her on what should have been a very celebratory night.

    • Thanks for your thoughts Kelly. I think I am going to do a longer post about criticism when I have time, because you make a really good point. I did like how his review was mainly focused on her past greatness, but then he called her performance in the first piece “wretched.” And Claudia La Rocco’s earlier review of Yvonne Borree’s farewell didn’t even mention how she was in her prime. Of course that’s because La Rocco didn’t see her dance then, she is too young. So why didn’t they have another critic cover that performance? I respect critics’ honesty – and Arlene Croce famously said in a democracy a critic must be critical – but it seems when a performer retires you want more of a review of their whole dancing life, with a short focus on that last performance. I really do feel for the dancers who get harshly critiqued on their final performances.

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