TO APPLAUD OR NOT TO APPLAUD

Here’s an interesting article on the BBC’s website about audience applause during classical music performances that I found to be at least somewhat apropos of our earlier discussion about applause during ballet. They’re a bit different since applause at the wrong time interferes more directly with music than with dance-watching, but, still, many of the same issues came up. Apparently, the BBC Proms festival of classical music is currently underway, which draws many newcomers.

I have to say, I greatly appreciate the word “numpties” used by one commenter :)

2 Comments

  1. Audience etiquette is rarely taught at home or in school and is at best learned by going to performances and learning by imitation… I suppose. It's a herd (no pun intended) mentality thingie.

    I prefer more silence DURING performances, but understand that, for example in opera, fans have a hard time containing themselves after a well done aria. I suppose the same can be said of a PDD in ballet., but in the middle of a performance IS distracting to me.

    Talking, and other audience noise is very offensive as is people in general who can't sit still, or have a hacking cough. YUCK. But in the end a live performance will have all that mixed in as it's not a studio production.

    Unfortunately for dance fans, live is the main means to consume that art so “undisturbed” by audience interference is a rare thing.

    My guess is that opera fans are the most demonstrative of their feelings at performances.

  2. Audience etiquette is rarely taught at home or in school and is at best learned by going to performances and learning by imitation… I suppose. It's a herd (no pun intended) mentality thingie.

    I prefer more silence DURING performances, but understand that, for example in opera, fans have a hard time containing themselves after a well done aria. I suppose the same can be said of a PDD in ballet., but in the middle of a performance IS distracting to me.

    Talking, and other audience noise is very offensive as is people in general who can't sit still, or have a hacking cough. YUCK. But in the end a live performance will have all that mixed in as it's not a studio production.

    Unfortunately for dance fans, live is the main means to consume that art so “undisturbed” by audience interference is a rare thing.

    My guess is that opera fans are the most demonstrative of their feelings at performances.

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